Author: Tara Bartley

Employee Spotlight on Nikhil Ramakrishnan, Marketing Specialist

“Where I grew up in India was a huge inspiration to me and shaped who I am today. So being able to incorporate parts of that in my music and my creative process is rewarding.”

Nikhil Ramakrishnan, marketing specialist at REsurety

“I grew up all over the place. I was born in Pennsylvania, but I only lived there for two or three years before moving to New York. Then we moved to Singapore for a year. Then back to New York and eventually we moved to New Delhi, where I did middle school and high school. It was definitely a lot of different cultures and a little bit of culture shock here and there. 

“When I first moved to India, I didn’t grasp how cool the experience was. I had to learn the language from scratch. I had to start at a preschool level because I didn’t know anything. After two or three years, I became fluent in Hindi though, which was pretty impressive, I didn’t think I’d be able to do that.

“For a long time, I really had no idea what I wanted to do. When I was in high school, I took a couple of broad business classes that gave a feel for each field within business. Afterwards, I decided that business would be the best fit. And within those classes, I was pretty good at marketing. I also enjoyed the marketing side the most. 

“I always knew that I wanted to come back to the U.S. for college. I had done 10 years in India, it was time for a change. I went into college as a marketing major. After taking a few classes, I knew that that was what I wanted to pursue.

“I like the connecting with people aspect, because you really have to understand what a person is thinking or what a person is looking for. That human touch in marketing is something that you don’t often find in other parts of business. And there’s so many different ways of targeting people and reaching people. People think and behave in so many different ways. There’s not just one blanket method of targeting or hitting on somebody’s interest. 

“I also really enjoy music. I make music in my free time. It’s mostly hip hop and rap tracks. It’s cool to see how my music has evolved. It started out as just a hobby with my college roommate and it’s now grown to where we’re putting on local shows, meeting new artists from the area, and growing our network in the music space as well. 

“Living in India definitely shaped my taste in music. I actually wrote a whole song about the city that I used to live in. Where I grew up in India was a huge inspiration to me and shaped who I am today. So being able to incorporate parts of that in my music and my creative process is rewarding.

“I just graduated from Northeastern University about two and a half months ago. The clean energy field was always something that I was around growing up, because my dad worked in energy companies. It was never a situation where I was forcing myself to pursue energy. It was just if an opportunity to work in energy came up, I’d definitely consider it. It just so happened to work out that way with REsurety. 

“I’m looking forward to growing and developing more as a marketer in this new role. It already feels like the work I’m doing is very meaningful and making an impact on the organization. I’m also excited for the amount of growth potential that the energy field has to offer. I think the future is looking really bright for it and I’m excited to be a part of it.”

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Clean Integration Podcast: Managing Intermittent Power Risks

Clean Integration Podcast by Soluna

Listen in as John Belizaire, CEO at Soluna Computing and Lee Taylor, CEO at REsurety discuss the challenge of intermittency in the renewable energy market. The podcast covers REsurety’s impact on the clean energy economy through their innovative tools like Locational Marginal Emissions (LMEs) and hedging strategies.

The Clean Integration Podcast features experts in the renewable energy industry discussing the path to making renewables the primary, most affordable energy source. The podcast is sponsored by Soluna, a utility-scale developer that combines renewable energy power plants with high-performance computing facilities.

The Enhancement and Standardization of Climate-Related Disclosures for Investors

Wind Energy

REsurety’s letter to the Securities and Exchange Commission Re: File No. S7-10-22, dated June 17, 2022

AN EXCERPT:

On behalf of REsurety, Inc., a leading analytics provider in the clean energy economy, we are writing in support of File No. S7-10-22: The Enhancement and Standardization of Climate-Related Disclosures for Investors. We also suggest two specific language refinements to improve the accuracy and transparency of Scope 2 emissions disclosures.

Anticipated Value of the Proposed Rule

For the last 10 years, REsurety has helped our clients understand the risks and value of buying and selling electricity from clean energy projects. Many of our clients develop renewable energy projects, have made voluntary public GHG reduction commitments, or own assets exposed to climate-related risk. The SEC’s proposal to require detailed climate-related disclosures has the potential to benefit our customers, as well as the public and the planet. By requiring disclosures from a large category of companies, the proposal protects investors from unintentional exposure to climate-related risk. By standardizing disclosure requirements and requiring attestation, the proposal can also help substantiate GHG reduction claims. In short, the proposed rule has the potential to increase efficiencies in capital markets, boost investor confidence and encourage companies to take effective climate action at scale.

Challenges with the GHG Protocol

While we strongly applaud the SEC’s aims, we are concerned about the pivotal role the GHG Protocol plays in the SEC’s proposal, particularly with respect to Scope 2 emissions disclosures. The proposed GHG emissions disclosure requirements are based “primarily on the GHG Protocol’s concept of scopes and related methodology”.1 The proposed rule cites the GHG Protocol Scope 2 Guidance as a methodological source for determining Scope 2 inventories.2

The GHG Protocol Scope 2 Guidance allows reporting entities to select from an extensive hierarchy of emissions factor data to calculate their footprints. Application of some of these emissions factors would result in footprints that differ materially from actual GHG emissions. For example, the current Scope 2 Guidance lists Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) as the highest-quality “emissions factor” data type but takes no position on where or when RECs are produced relative to their consumption. An entity consuming power in a coal-heavy grid could eliminate its Market-Based Scope 2 footprint by purchasing sufficient RECs from a very clean grid, even when such a purchase would have a negligible effect on actual GHG emissions.

By relying on average emissions factors, current Scope 2 guidance also risks sending signals to registrants that are at odds with the goal of reducing carbon emissions. Consider a registrant purchasing solar energy that mostly displaces coal generation, in a grid that also includes considerable baseload nuclear. Since the average emissions rate of this grid is much lower than the emissions rate of the displaced coal, the reduction in the registrant’s carbon footprint would not reflect the solar energy’s full carbon impact. As a result, the registrant may hesitate to contract for the solar energy in the first place, knowing that its actual carbon benefits could not be reported.

Read our full letter.

We love talking with anyone who shares our goals of more accurate carbon impact measurement and the tools to maximize that impact – so please contact us at [email protected] if you have any questions or want to connect and discuss.

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Footnotes:

[1] Proposed Rule, §I.D.2.

[2] Proposed Rule, §II.G.2.c (p. 195). The proposed rule also cites the EPA’s guidance on Indirect Emissions from Purchased Electricity, which is highly similar to the GHG Protocol Scope 2 guidance. See §II.G.1.b. (p. 160)


Disclaimer.

June 2022 Project Finance NewsWire

How Hedges Have Changed Since Uri, Lee Taylor, REsurety CEO

Project Finance NewsWire spotlights developments affecting project finance and the energy sector; you can find Lee Taylor’s feature on page 15.

AN EXCERPT:

Cover page of the June 2022 Project Finance NewsWire report.
A publication from Norton Rose Fulbright

The hedge market is offering the same menu of options a year and a half after a sudden cold snap in Texas left some power projects facing huge losses.

However, more attention is being paid to how to cap exposure in extreme scenarios.

Winter Storm Uri was an extreme cold event in late February 2021, centered in Texas but also affecting neighboring states, that was a one-in-10-year or one-in-50-year event, depending on which meteorologist you ask. It was not off the charts, but it involved an extreme level of sustained cold. There were deaths and significant property damage in Texas.

The storm led to a spike in electricity demand, especially for heating, and a shortfall in supply.

The shortfall in supply was driven by a number of factors, but the main driver was power plants froze physically and transmission infrastructure was shut down. These factors affected all types of power plants. The most pronounced effect was on gas-fired generation, but renewables, and wind in particular, were affected as well.

There was a pronounced financial impact in ERCOT because of the mechanism within ERCOT to reward generation during spikes in demand. There are administrative adders to the spot electricity price that force the price of power to go to a cap, incentivizing supply when demand spikes. At the time, the cap was $9,000 a megawatt hour. The result was that a spot market in which the price for electricity is often in the $20 to $40 range per MWh, was suddenly pricing power at $9,000 a MWh for three days.

Continue reading by downloading the PDF.

Employee Spotlight on Lizzy Kalikasingh, Associate, Risk Analytics

Lizzy Kalikasingh

“I was very science and math oriented. And my favorite time of the year was the science fair.”

Employee Spotlight on Lizzy Kalikasingh, Associate, Risk Analytics, REsurety

“The first memories I have of wanting to pursue a degree in engineering are from third grade. They gave us a huge book of career opportunities, and I was like, ‘Oh, chemical engineering sounds like a cool thing!’

“I was very science and math oriented. And my favorite time of the year was the science fair. One of my favorite projects was hot and cold pressure systems, that was in second grade. Buoyancy was third grade. Then in fourth grade I did molecules, how ionic bonds work, with the styrofoam balls and pipe cleaner diagrams of organic compounds. Yes, that was my favorite time.

“A tour across my county in Ohio was a pretty big influence on me wanting to go into renewable energy. My dad and I went and visited five or six farms to see how they installed solar panels on their barn sheds, and how it helps these very rural communities. I thought if my county could do it, anybody can do it.

“I did an internship during high school with an agricultural facility in my hometown that does biochemistry sorts of things. I assisted a professor in synthesizing bio fertilizer based on an algae component. In Ohio, there’s a lot of agriculture with chemical runoff that harms wildlife and the environment, so having something like an algae compound in the fertilizer gives a new perspective – you can take something natural and reproduce it to help the environment as well.

“After I graduated high school, I did a gap year in Taiwan. I didn’t know what I wanted to do and I knew for some friends the experience contributed to them recentering themselves, and learning a new skill. I told the program they could put me anywhere, since I had already been to Europe and South America, where most other students choose to go. I wanted to go to someplace I had never been.

“When you’re in a country where you don’t know the language, you really have to rely on other people. So it was all about building connections and gaining independence. Taiwan is a very homogeneous country and I always felt like a foreigner everywhere I went. No matter how well I learned the language and how well I could navigate the train systems, it was still hard to assimilate completely, but everyone in the country was really friendly.

“I went to Case Western Reserve University in Ohio, and pursued a degree in Materials Science and Engineering. There is a lot of focus on renewables, with a campus wind turbine and solar farm. I had never thought a wind turbine was related to material science, but along with being electrical and mechanical, materials do play a big part of that construction. So, it was kind of a case study on degradation over time for certain types of materials, polymers and some rare earth metals. It’s something I definitely wanted to contribute to, so I did a lot of research in those facilities during my undergraduate career.

“Through a Great Lakes Energy Institute program, I became an operations intern at EverPower, a company that monitored and maintained a fleet of wind farms across the U.S. For them, I designed a tool that visualizes operational performance over time. It was like an app – you choose the month or time you want to inspect, and it’ll go through all the turbines and see if there’s anything that was meaningfully different from the selected look-back period. So you can see if a temperature sensor could be broken, if speed sensors are misreading, things like that. It would send a plot after it finished running, that with the resource report, was produced to the operations team. So that was very useful in determining how I wanted to go into data analytics based on operations rather than a research role.

“I then got an internship at REsurety, and never left! We have jerseys with our employee number on them. When I joined I was in the 20’s but I bet I’m 8 or 9 in seniority now. So it’s like I’m almost up to CEO-level seniority!

“I joined the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Steering Committee, and it has really put me in a position of learning and accountability, helping people in the company with promotion transparency or having a safe space to talk about social stressors and mental health. There is a lot of social justice fatigue, and sometimes it’s hard to bring the mindset into the workplace where people tend to compartmentalize. But when we add that perspective to our work community, it makes it feel like other perspectives are welcome and you are heard.

”Creating interpersonal connections is one of my stronger skills. Right now, I’m deep in data, more of a machine runner. So I look forward to being a manager, contributing to company culture, facilitating teams, and guiding younger generations as a mentor.”

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